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SHAPES 

OF C LAY 




JUNE ' 1930 



PUBLISHED BY 

GLADDING, McBEAN & CO. 




SOMMER 6? KAUFMANN, INC., SAN FRANCISCO 

Architecture moderne is best expressed in color, and terra-cotta is a medium of unlimited 

color possibilities.... For this shoe store Gladding, McBean 6s? Co. produced a terra-cotta 

in turquoise or blue-green with ornament moderne in low relief. 

Designed by Kem Webber Albert F. Roller, Architect 

P. J. Walker Co., Builders 



SHAPES OF CLAY 

Published Quarterly by Gladding, McBean 6? Co. 
General Office: 660 Market Street, San Francisco 

Edward F. O'Day, Editor 

•• ■ — ■ •* 

Volume VI June, 1930 Number 2 



W! 



'HEN Alexander 6? Baldwin, the great factors of the Hawai' 
ian Islands, asked for a building in Honolulu to house their 
many activities, their architects, Dickey & Wood and C. W. 
Dickey, responded with an architectural achievement of the first order. 
They reared a palace of business that admirably expresses the cross cur' 
rents of life that have made the Hawaiian Islands colorful as well as pros' 
perous. This they did by blending occidental with oriental, and both with 
Pacific-tropical influences. Basing their plan upon true Renaissance design, 
they incorporated features that suggest, without bluntly following, Chi' 
nese and native Hawaiian models. The Alexander 6? Baldwin Building is 
a masterpiece of architecture — an addition to the steadily growing list of 
Hawaiian homes and buildings that challenge comparison with similar 
work anywhere on the mainland of the United States. 

The exterior of this three-story private building is entirely of Gladding, 
McBean 6? Co. terra-cotta with a vertical tooled surface in a warm gray 
buff color. 

The roof carries the "flavor" of the native Hawaiian thatched roof 
crossed with Chinese. This "flavor" is subtly, restrainedly conveyed by 
the gently curved effect and the cool, shadowy overhang. The roof is cov 
ered with a roof tile especially manufactured by Gladding, McBean & Co. 
in greens, bronze greens, and softened red browns. The effect is very fine. 



SHAPES OF CLAY 

The entrance portico is richly treated in Gladding, McBean 6? Co. 
decorative tile — side walls, rear wall, ceiling, and floor. In the spacious 
counting'room are two decorative tile panels illustrative of the Island en' 
vironment. These, like the portico panels, are sympathetically related to 
the color scheme of their setting. 

A feature of great practical value in this room is the ceiling of acoustic 
decorative tile. The officials of Alexander 6? Baldwin report that this 
acoustic tile ceiling absorbs sound to the point, rarely attained, where 
just enough resonance remains to save the room from lifelessness. 

Charm inheres in this building, and its innate loveliness is enhanced by 
the native palm trees that sway their fans across its windows. 

****** 

Our frontispiece in color shows the new shoe store of Sommer 6? Kauf- 
mann, Inc., San Francisco. Among the other plates in this issue are two 
picturing the Berg Store Building of Portland. Here are two new build' 
ings for the retail trade that have called upon the resources of terracotta 
to aid in attracting and pleasing the buying public. 

The color possibilities of terra'Cotta led to its selection in both instances, 
though of course its other practical advantages were not forgotten. The 
permanence of terra'Cotta, its resistance to fire, its plastic response to orna' 
ment, and the ease with which it may be kept clean, are never overlooked 
by retail merchants. But here special emphasis for the use of terra'Cotta 
must be placed on the demand for color as used in the architecture we call 
moderne. Retail business knows the value in increased sales of color mc 
derne, and has learned that terra'Cotta is the ideal medium for obtaining 
striking color moderne effects. 

Gladding, McBean 6? Co. points to these two retail store buildings as 
an indication of the pains this company takes to keep well in the forefront 
of new architectural ideas. 




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I. ALEXANDER & BALDWIN BUILDING, HONOLULU 

Business of "the islands" ensconced amid native palms terra-cotta and roof tile without decora- 
tive tile within (including acoustic decorative tile for ceiling) all by Gladding, McBean 6? Co. 

Dickey &? Wood and C. W. Dickey, Architects Ralph Wooley, Contractor 



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II. ALEXANDER & BALDWIN BUILDING, HONOLULU 

Our terra'COtta and decorative tile in happy union terra-cotta columns chastely ornamented 

lead the eye to walls of subtle ceramic beauty. 

Dickey ii Wood and C. W. Dickey, Architects Ralph Wooley, Contractor 




III. ALEXANDER 6? BALDWIN BUILDING, HONOLULU 

An entrance portico where tile is paramount from floor to wall to ceiling a pattern colorfully 

rendered runs in a rhythm of subdued attractiveness. 

Dickey 6? Wood and C. W. Dickey, Architects Ralph Wooley, Contractor 




IV. ALEXANDER 6? BALDWIN BUILDING, HONOLULU 

'When the fleeting shadows fall" looking out from the portico of decorative tile through columns 

of terra'Cotta to the night of a Honolulu street. 

Dickey 6? Wood and C. W. Dickey, Architects Ralph Wooley, Contractor 




V. MARICOPA COUNTY COURT- HOUSE AND PHOENIX CITY HALL 

PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

Civic and juridical dignity combined city and county ideals expressed in architecture that leans 

solidly on the strength of terra-cotta a Gladding, McBean 6? Co. investiture. 

Edward F. Nield, and Lescher 6? Mahoney, Architects 
Edwards, Wildey £s? Dixon, Contractors 







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VI. MARICOPA COUNTY COURT- HOUSE, PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

The court-house entrance making a material symbolic ashlar and stern ornament in our terra- 
cotta the treatment is of buff enamel pulsichrome, with heavy texture. 

Edward F. Nield, and Lescher & Mahoney, Architects 
Edwards, Wildey & Dixon, Contractors 




VII. CITY HALL, PHOENIX, ARIZONA 

Deliberately contrasted with the sternness of the court-house entrance ornament strikingly yet 

sparingly used our terra-cotta again wielding its plastic and dignified power. 

Edward F. Nield, and Lescher 6? Mahoney, Architects 
Edwards, Wildey &? Dixon, Contractors 




VIII. NINTH AND BROADWAY BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Terra'cotta climbs to the Los Angeles height limit beautifying window openings in its 

ascent this is Gladding, McBean 6? Co. warm buff textured. 

Claud Beelman, Architect J. V. McNeil, Contractor 




IX. NINTH AND BROADWAY BUILDING, LOS ANGELES 

Los Angeles, a city practically without hills, calls for architectural ornament to be enjoyed close at 
hand our warm buff textured terra-cotta embellishing a main portal. 

Claud Beelman, Architect J. V. McNeil, Contractor 




X. BERG STORE BUILDING, PORTLAND, OREGON 

Terra'cotta colorfulness ashlar of black enamel trim of textured gold finish second'floor 

spandrels, cream enamel ; parapet spandrels, dark greenish blue. 

Designed by Grand Rapids Store Equipment Company 
Ross B. Hammond Company, Contractor. 




XI. BERG STORE BUILDING, PORTLAND, OREGON 

For smaller store buildings terra-cotta may be relied upon as an advertising factor black and gold, 

cream and greenish blue combined in striking harmonies from our kilns. 

Designed by Grand Rapids Store Equipment Company 
Ross B. Hammond Company, Contractor 




XII. HILLS BROS., LOS ANGELES 

Brick and terra-cotta conjoined modernly, but in the true old tradition of Bologna the brick, our 

coral ruffle the terra-cotta, our buff pulsichrome. 

George W. Kelham, Architect P. J. Walker Company, Builders 




XIII. HILLS BROS., LOS ANGELES 

The lobby lifted to special distinction by the use of our decorative tile the tile is of a red 

body, giving warmth as well as attractiveness. 

George W. Kelham, Architect P. J. Walker Company, Builders 




XIV. HOTEL LAFAYETTE, LONG BEACH, CALIFORNIA 

An hotel entrance with symbolic ornament conservatively applied plastic expression of sculpture 

moderne the medium is our terra'cotta, a warm buff textured. 

Schilling 6? Schilling, Architects Charles W. Pettifer Co., Contractor 




XV. CHRIS JONES HOME, SIERRA OAKS, SACRAMENTO 

Color value studied roughness of texture irregular laying Cotswold shingle tile suggests the 

Shakespeare country a roof in russet shades running strongly to gun metal. 

Designed by Frank Williams 



GLADDING, McBEAN 6? CO. 

Founded 1875 

# 

San Francisco Office, 660 Market Street 

Los Angeles Office, 621 South Hope Street 

New York Office, Lincoln Building, 60 E. 42nd Street 

Seattle Office, 1500 ist Avenue, S. Portland Office, 454 Everett Street 

Spokane Office, 524 Old National Bank Building 

Oakland Office, Twentysecond and Market Streets 

Fresno Office, San Joaquin Materials Co., 744 G Street 
* 

CLAY PRODUCTS 



Printed by Taylor &* Taylor, San Francisco